My Platform

Now more than ever the city of Boston needs elected officials that are committed to connecting and representing all residents to the eventual recovery of the city from the pandemic and racial unrest.  I will remain laser focused on:

As your Boston City Councilor at Large I have the tenacity to address this complex problem of affordable housing with a methodical approach that will unite a collective body to finding sustainable solutions for our residents.  One of the critical areas to resolve is Boston’s Average Median Income (AMI).  Set by the US Census Bureau, the AMI determines from Census data the average median income for a specific area based on income reported during census collection of all household members above age 15, even those with no income.  The AMI for Boston is based on the Greater Metropolitan Boston Area which includes Brookline, Belmont, Cambridge and other towns, neighborhoods with higher incomes that drives Boston’s AMI.  Boston’s AMI needs to be precise to reflect the actual average median income. I will work with local and federal government to review how Boston’s AMI is derived.  Further, I am committed to addressing affordable housing based on true average median households for Boston so we will be able to live and have the pride of home ownership in our own neighborhoods. This means that we have to address employment, workforce development and education.  Based on a 2018 listing in Boston.gov the AMI for Boston was $55,122 for a XXX family. I will work to match the Boston AMI with livable wages.  The resolution to this issue is multi-faceted and I am laser focused on finding alternative measures to combat the affordable housing situation in Boston by looking at not just allocating affordable units in new developments, but also establishing upscale housing developments where the entire project is affordable for mixed incomes. 

The issue of affordable housing is even more disparate in the communities of color. According to a recent 2020 spotlight article in the Boston Globe, the average net worth of an African American residing in Boston was $8.00.  This data resulted from research done in a report from the Federal Reserve Bank Boston, Duke University and the New School.  Couple all this with the fact that the Globe also reported in 2021 that median price for a single home in Boston was $765,000.  While the Greater Boston Association of Realtors reported the average cost for a condo in Boston was $622,000.  Compare these housing prices to figures by the Boston 2030 Project that list the average home value in Boston at $464,000, compared to $177,000 in other rural cities across the country. 

If we are to keep the brain power here in the City of Boston, I will work to not only fix this issue but ensure that we housing for everyone.  I will work with the Boston Neighborhood Development Office, The Community Development Corporations, The Boston First Time Buyers Program, The 2030 Project, a group established to provide affordable housing in Boston by 2030 and the countless other organizations that are all doing good work to move this agenda forward.

I am tenacious around this issue of affordable housing and know that someone, like myself, with a breath for successfully fulfilling goals can move this agenda forward.  My campaign for Boston City Councilor at Large is to take a stance on this issues and create a transparent plan for all to eradicate the lack of housing in our city.

Boston, the first public school system in the United States can be a pioneer in transforming the educational experience for the 54,000 students it educates and their parents who rely on the district to provide a quality education. As a Boston City Councilor at Large I will work with the leadership at the Boston Public Schools (BPS), the City of Boston and federal government to examine not only the didactic teaching and curriculum, but also the non- tangibles around building infrastructure.  In my work at City Year, I hired a strong corp of volunteers to work in the Boston Public Schools providing teacher support and before/after school programming.  My commitment to the children, families, educators and staff of BPS is to work with them to build a world renowned education system.  Some of the ways I propose we do this are outlined here: We have to start early.  According to the National Education Association, children in high quality education programs before age five are less likely to repeat a grade, less likely to be identified as needing special needs resources, more prepared academically for later grades, more likely to graduate from high school and ultimately higher wage earners when in the workforce.  I propose a universal Pre-kindergarten where every child living in Boston, 4 years of age, would have a seat in a Boston Public School.  Even with all the data and statistics that prove early childhood education is beneficial, a 2021 Boston Globe article reported that BPS can only accommodate half of the seats needed for the estimated 6,400 children age 4 living in Boston.  As the oldest public school district in this country leaving half of its students without the necessary preparation, starts us off at a disadvantage. Just some of areas I will address surrounding Pre-K are:
  1. I will work with State government to advocate for additional funding for Pre-k programs in Boston, much like New York City did to increase seating capacity.
  2. I would work with public and private daycares and early childhood programs, like Action for Boston Community Development-Head Start to provide a vibrant curriculum for Pre-k students to ensure they are keeping pace to enter into the BPS system ready for success.
  3. I will create programs for parents in communities of color to inform them of the enrollment process and timelines to secure seats for their children.
Next, I will work with the Boston Teacher’s Union (BTU) to support our Teachers, Para-Professionals, Substitute Teachers and other educators.  Teachers have devoted their lives to the education of children and are one of the most critical components to closing the achievement gap.  I will be a City Councilor at Large who will sit down and hear the needs of our educators.  I will support Teachers to look at issues of class sizes, supplies and resources, professional development and more. As a City Councilor at Large I will work with the Superintendent to review the capital budget and the BuildBPS Plan.  The physical structures of many BPS buildings are in dire need of renovations.  We may be the oldest district in the nation, but that should be reflected on a plague.  We need to address our HVAC, electrical and structural ailments of the schools so that we can bring in state of the art technology, central air conditioning, clean air and water filtration systems and provide an environment that is healthy, safe and inviting for our children and educators. While these are just some of the educational items I will address as your City Councilor at Large, preparing BPS to return and recover from a pandemic will be one of my first orders of priority.  We have lost so much this past year, but we also have to look at what might be opportunities going forward.  We need to have assessment tools to measure student progress this past year.  I will work to provide resources to help students recover academic losses from the disrupted year of remote education.  We will have to solicit support from our teams within BPS and even our external partners, like City Year and others to get students back on track.  I will work with BPS to look at how remote education may have some positive existence in our school system in reducing snow days, student absenteeism and even expanding outreach to bring programs into the classroom from remote locations across the world. This work will not be easy but as your City Councilor at Large I will make sure that we build a school system of excellence that will be admired for centuries to come.

As your Boston City Councilor at Large I want to build careers.   I will create a workforce development commission in charge of finding new and innovated ways to link workforce trainings to quality, high paying jobs.  I will work with businesses to create pipeline programs that lead to hires with livable wages. I have experience in creating successful training programs that led to jobs. As the Manager of Recruitment at Encore Boston I established a relationship with Mass Hires and the Urban League of Boston to offer high paying jobs that were CORI friendly.  I was responsible for hiring thousands of employees at Encore Boston, the majority Boston city residents.  While working as the Teen Director at the Yawkey Club of Roxbury-Boys & Girls Club I developed a co-op opportunity for high school seniors to gain work experience at such respected institutions like State Street Corp.

I want to focus on real community policing and have our brave law enforcement officers walking and riding bikes through neighborhoods and getting to know the residents. We have been to focus on police cruisers in neighborhood but not engagement from those officers. As a City Councilor I will be focused on rebuilding relationships with police but also serving as a soundboard for community members so we can ensure that the correct services are provided for each specific community. My goal is to have monthly town halls where the focus is listening more than talking at constituents. I believe it is my job to listen and then take action to help relieve issues. I plan to be proactive and engaging on the issues of public safety and I want to ensure we keep our streets and families safe in their neighborhoods and making sure to hold safety officials accountable when it comes to abuse of power.

The city of Boston is in a real crisis when it comes to methadone issues. In many regards there has been little to no real movement on this crisis and the time for talking without action is over. I have served hot meals and have met with key stakeholders in Roxbury around this issue. My goal is less police and more counseling, rehabilitation, and housing to help these citizens get clean and back into society. We as residents cannot forget we are talking about human beings that need our help and not criticism.  I am for reopening the facility on long island but ensuring there is real funding for rehabilitation and workforce development programs that are linked to real jobs.

Veterans have served and fought for our rights and often come home and face homelessness and lack of healthcare and general aid. As a city councilor I want to use the motto of no soldier left behind. We need to ensure that Veterans have adequate rights to job training that led to actual jobs. We also need to push against the idea that suffering from trauma or PTSD makes them less of a person but provide actual help, resources and care to those who are suffering. We owe veterans our time and resources and we need to do whatever possible to make sure we help with reclamation into society and that we hold agencies accountable to make sure they provide the resources that are owed to our brave men and women.

As your Boston City Councilor at Large I have the tenacity to address this complex problem of affordable housing with a methodical approach that will unite a collective body to finding sustainable solutions for our residents.  One of the critical areas to resolve is Boston’s Average Median Income (AMI).  Set by the US Census Bureau, the AMI determines from Census data the average median income for a specific area based on income reported during census collection of all household members above age 15, even those with no income.  The AMI for Boston is based on the Greater Metropolitan Boston Area which includes Brookline, Belmont, Cambridge and other towns, neighborhoods with higher incomes that drives Boston’s AMI.  Boston’s AMI needs to be precise to reflect the actual average median income. I will work with local and federal government to review how Boston’s AMI is derived.  Further, I am committed to addressing affordable housing based on true average median households for Boston so we will be able to live and have the pride of home ownership in our own neighborhoods. This means that we have to address employment, workforce development and education.  Based on a 2018 listing in Boston.gov the AMI for Boston was $55,122 for a XXX family. I will work to match the Boston AMI with livable wages.  The resolution to this issue is multi-faceted and I am laser focused on finding alternative measures to combat the affordable housing situation in Boston by looking at not just allocating affordable units in new developments, but also establishing upscale housing developments where the entire project is affordable for mixed incomes. 

The issue of affordable housing is even more disparate in the communities of color. According to a recent 2020 spotlight article in the Boston Globe, the average net worth of an African American residing in Boston was $8.00.  This data resulted from research done in a report from the Federal Reserve Bank Boston, Duke University and the New School.  Couple all this with the fact that the Globe also reported in 2021 that median price for a single home in Boston was $765,000.  While the Greater Boston Association of Realtors reported the average cost for a condo in Boston was $622,000.  Compare these housing prices to figures by the Boston 2030 Project that list the average home value in Boston at $464,000, compared to $177,000 in other rural cities across the country. 

If we are to keep the brain power here in the City of Boston, I will work to not only fix this issue but ensure that we housing for everyone.  I will work with the Boston Neighborhood Development Office, The Community Development Corporations, The Boston First Time Buyers Program, The 2030 Project, a group established to provide affordable housing in Boston by 2030 and the countless other organizations that are all doing good work to move this agenda forward.

I am tenacious around this issue of affordable housing and know that someone, like myself, with a breath for successfully fulfilling goals can move this agenda forward.  My campaign for Boston City Councilor at Large is to take a stance on this issues and create a transparent plan for all to eradicate the lack of housing in our city.

Boston, the first public school system in the United States can be a pioneer in transforming the educational experience for the 54,000 students it educates and their parents who rely on the district to provide a quality education. As a Boston City Councilor at Large I will work with the leadership at the Boston Public Schools (BPS), the City of Boston and federal government to examine not only the didactic teaching and curriculum, but also the non- tangibles around building infrastructure.  In my work at City Year, I hired a strong corp of volunteers to work in the Boston Public Schools providing teacher support and before/after school programming.  My commitment to the children, families, educators and staff of BPS is to work with them to build a world renowned education system.  Some of the ways I propose we do this are outlined here:

We have to start early.  According to the National Education Association, children in high quality education programs before age five are less likely to repeat a grade, less likely to be identified as needing special needs resources, more prepared academically for later grades, more likely to graduate from high school and ultimately higher wage earners when in the workforce.  I propose a universal Pre-kindergarten where every child living in Boston, 4 years of age, would have a seat in a Boston Public School.  Even with all the data and statistics that prove early childhood education is beneficial, a 2021 Boston Globe article reported that BPS can only accommodate half of the seats needed for the estimated 6,400 children age 4 living in Boston.  As the oldest public school district in this country leaving half of its students without the necessary preparation, starts us off at a disadvantage.

 Just some of areas I will address surrounding Pre-K are:

  1. I will work with State government to advocate for additional funding for Pre-k programs in Boston, much like New York City did to increase seating capacity.
  2. I would work with public and private daycares and early childhood programs, like Action for Boston Community Development-Head Start to provide a vibrant curriculum for Pre-k students to ensure they are keeping pace to enter into the BPS system ready for success.
  3. I will create programs for parents in communities of color to inform them of the enrollment process and timelines to secure seats for their children.

Next, I will work with the Boston Teacher’s Union (BTU) to support our Teachers, Para-Professionals, Substitute Teachers and other educators.  Teachers have devoted their lives to the education of children and are one of the most critical components to closing the achievement gap.  I will be a City Councilor at Large who will sit down and hear the needs of our educators.  I will support Teachers to look at issues of class sizes, supplies and resources, professional development and more. 

As a City Councilor at Large I will work with the Superintendent to review the capital budget and the BuildBPS Plan.  The physical structures of many BPS buildings are in dire need of renovations.  We may be the oldest district in the nation, but that should be reflected on a plague.  We need to address our HVAC, electrical and structural ailments of the schools so that we can bring in state of the art technology, central air conditioning, clean air and water filtration systems and provide an environment that is healthy, safe and inviting for our children and educators.

While these are just some of the educational items I will address as your City Councilor at Large, preparing BPS to return and recover from a pandemic will be one of my first orders of priority.  We have lost so much this past year, but we also have to look at what might be opportunities going forward.  We need to have assessment tools to measure student progress this past year.  I will work to provide resources to help students recover academic losses from the disrupted year of remote education.  We will have to solicit support from our teams within BPS and even our external partners, like City Year and others to get students back on track.  I will work with BPS to look at how remote education may have some positive existence in our school system in reducing snow days, student absenteeism and even expanding outreach to bring programs into the classroom from remote locations across the world.

This work will not be easy but as your City Councilor at Large I will make sure that we build a school system of excellence that will be admired for centuries to come.

As your Boston City Councilor at Large I want to build careers.   I will create a workforce development commission in charge of finding new and innovated ways to link workforce trainings to quality, high paying jobs.  I will work with businesses to create pipeline programs that lead to hires with livable wages. I have experience in creating successful training programs that led to jobs. As the Manager of Recruitment at Encore Boston I established a relationship with Mass Hires and the Urban League of Boston to offer high paying jobs that were CORI friendly.  I was responsible for hiring thousands of employees at Encore Boston, the majority Boston city residents.  While working as the Teen Director at the Yawkey Club of Roxbury-Boys & Girls Club I developed a co-op opportunity for high school seniors to gain work experience at such respected institutions like State Street Corp.

I want to focus on real community policing and have our brave law enforcement officers walking and riding bikes through neighborhoods and getting to know the residents. We have been to focus on police cruisers in neighborhood but not engagement from those officers. As a City Councilor I will be focused on rebuilding relationships with police but also serving as a soundboard for community members so we can ensure that the correct services are provided for each specific community. My goal is to have monthly town halls where the focus is listening more than talking at constituents. I believe it is my job to listen and then take action to help relieve issues. I plan to be proactive and engaging on the issues of public safety and I want to ensure we keep our streets and families safe in their neighborhoods and making sure to hold safety officials accountable when it comes to abuse of power.

The city of Boston is in a real crisis when it comes to methadone issues. In many regards there has been little to no real movement on this crisis and the time for talking without action is over. I have served hot meals and have met with key stakeholders in Roxbury around this issue. My goal is less police and more counseling, rehabilitation, and housing to help these citizens get clean and back into society. We as residents cannot forget we are talking about human beings that need our help and not criticism.  I am for reopening the facility on long island but ensuring there is real funding for rehabilitation and workforce development programs that are linked to real jobs.

Veterans have served and fought for our rights and often come home and face homelessness and lack of healthcare and general aid. As a city councilor I want to use the motto of no soldier left behind. We need to ensure that Veterans have adequate rights to job training that led to actual jobs. We also need to push against the idea that suffering from trauma or PTSD makes them less of a person but provide actual help, resources and care to those who are suffering. We owe veterans our time and resources and we need to do whatever possible to make sure we help with reclamation into society and that we hold agencies accountable to make sure they provide the resources that are owed to our brave men and women.

nv-logo-sticky2

Take a Stance with Vance

CONTACT US

Phone: (978) 341-4580
Email : nickvancecampaign@gmail.com

CONNECT WITH THE CAMPAIGN

Copyright © 2021 Committee to Elect Nick Vance | Powered by Sway + Convey